Commission Proposed Maps

Congressional Maps

The Washington State Redistricting Commission released proposed Congressional District maps on Tuesday, September 28. Maps are available online to view and provide public comment, and also as a PDF and Shapefile download.

April Sims

House Democratic Caucus Appointee

View the Commissioner's proposed Congressional District map below:

View & Comment OnlineDownload PDF of MapDownload Shapefiles

Commissioner Statement on Draft Congressional District Map

Commissioner Sims is proud to release a proposed map that prioritizes her values and her commitment to the Commission’s requirement to consider districts that are: equal in population; preserve communities of interest; reduce division of county and municipal boundaries; don’t favor or discriminate against a candidate or party; encourage electoral competition; and are compact, convenient, and contiguous.

Read Full Statement +

Values in Action: Commissioner Sims’ Proposed Congressional District Map

Commissioner Sims is proud to release a proposed map that prioritizes her values and her commitment to the Commission’s requirement to consider districts that are: equal in population; preserve communities of interest; reduce division of county and municipal boundaries; don’t favor or discriminate against a candidate or party; encourage electoral competition; and are compact, convenient, and contiguous.

This draft map reflects the many hours spent listening to and reviewing public input, as well as the government-to-government consultations with Tribal Councils, and redraws our state’s congressional districts to fairly rebalance state population growth. She remains committed to her values and the Commission’s responsibility to create districts that provide fair representation.  

  • Protecting fair and effective representation
  • Maintaining and creating communities of interest
  • Respecting Tribal sovereignty and the government-to-government relationship with Tribal partners
  • Centering and engaging communities that have been historically underrepresented

Values in Action: Protecting fair and effective representation

The greater Puget Sound experienced growth in already densely populated areas, while other parts of the state saw much slower growth. Ensuring that communities of interest weren’t split while rebalancing the population of congressional districts presented unique challenges; however, the end result is a draft map that reduces city/county splits and preserves communities of interest beyond city borders. This draft map both rebalances the population of our state and draws boundaries that will lead to more opportunities to engage and grow the electorate.

Values in Action: Maintaining and creating communities of interest

Following criteria laid out in the law, this draft map seeks to reduce the number counties currently split by congressional districts. Seven counties see a reduction in the number of congressional district splits, with four of those now wholly contained in one CD. In addition, the map responds to the request to keep the current Eastern Washington congressional boundaries as North/South districts, illustrating voices from every community were considered.  Responding to some of the most requested comments during the Commissions’ public meetings, this map moves Walla Walla County into the 5th congressional district and consolidates many South King County cities in the 9th congressional district.

Values in Action: Respecting Tribal sovereignty

The proposal reflects feedback from Tribal Councils during our formal consultation process and, in some cases, comments submitted directly to the Commission. Balancing community requests and respecting those Tribes who provided feedback, the draft map reflects the following:

  • Nisqually: remains in the 10th CD
  • Yakama: consolidated into one CD
  • Tulalip: remains in the 1st CD along with the neighboring community of Marysville
  • Colville: split between 4th and 5th CD
  • Chehalis: split between 3rd and 6th CD

Values in Action: Centering and engaging communities that have been historically underrepresented

This proposed map maintains the current majority POC congressional district in the 9th.  The 9th district includes more South King county cities lifting up the voices of those often underrepresented. This is to ensure their interests are centered and seeks to bolster inclusion in the electoral process.

Paul Graves

House Republican Caucus Appointee

View the Commissioner's proposed Congressional District map below:

View & Comment OnlineDownload PDF of MapDownload Shapefiles

Commissioner Statement on Draft Congressional District Map

This newly drawn congressional map creates two majority-minority congressional districts, twice the number from a decade ago and the most in state history. This map would give a powerful voice to groups that have in the past been underrepresented in the halls of Congress. It also increases competition, giving voters more choices and encouraging our members of Congress to listen to all their constituents.

Read Full Statement +

New Congressional Map Creates Historic Two Majority-Minority Districts; Fosters Competition

This newly drawn congressional map creates two majority-minority congressional districts, twice the number from a decade ago and the most in state history. This map would give a powerful voice to groups that have in the past been underrepresented in the halls of Congress. It also increases competition, giving voters more choices and encouraging our members of Congress to listen to all their constituents.

Fair Representation Should be Bipartisan Goal

Across the country, partisan special interests seek to divide us. But in Washington, with our independent redistricting Commission, we have the opportunity to reject that approach and instead to draw maps that are worthy of our time. Doubling the number of majority-minority districts is possible and should become our reality.

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, Washington State saw a 10 percent increase since 2010 of the proportion of residents who are people of color. More than a third of Washington’s voting age population is now non-white, and I believe we should draw more than one congressional district reflecting that change.

South Puget Sound drove much of that growth, and, without intending to, the 2010 map resulted in a division of that community. By consolidating and drawing two districts, the 9th and the 10th, that span Tacoma to Redmond, we can give a strong voice to those who in the past have been quieted.

Increasing Competition with Second Swing District

Washington D.C. is a mess, and a prime reason is that most members of Congress represent safe districts. When our representatives are only concerned about a challenge from their party’s base, it’s no surprise that they go to the nation’s capital and spend most of their time yelling at one another and not even pretending to conduct the basic functions of government. The answer is more competition, and I’m proud of this map for doubling the number of competitive districts in our state.

Under a standard definition of swing district—those within 3 percent of 50/50 using an average of Washington’s 2020 statewide election results—only one of Washington’s 10 districts, the 8th, is currently a swing district. Under this map, the 1st would also become a swing district, and the 3rd would be just 0.60 percent from being a swing district. Those changes would give Washington voters more choices and encourage better representation in Washington, D.C.

Brady Piñero Walkinshaw

Senate Democratic Caucus Appointee

View the Commissioner's proposed Congressional District map below:

View & Comment OnlineDownload PDF of MapDownload Shapefiles

Commissioner Statement on Draft Congressional District Map

Just as he reduced the number of cities needlessly split in his proposed legislative map, the goal of Commissioner Walkinshaw’s proposed congressional map is to reduce the number of county splits and draw more logical lines that reflect the reality of communities. In much of the state, it is county governments that maintain roads, provide important social and public health services, and are responsible for public safety and the administration of justice.

Read Full Statement +

Commissioner Walkinshaw's maps reflect a values-driven commitment to fair and effective representation in Washington State.

Just as he reduced the number of cities needlessly split in his proposed legislative map, the goal of Commissioner Walkinshaw’s proposed congressional map is to reduce the number of county splits and draw more logical lines that reflect the reality of communities. In much of the state, it is county governments that maintain roads, provide important social and public health services, and are responsible for public safety and the administration of justice.  

Commissioner Walkinshaw's maps reflect a values-driven commitment to fair and effective representation in Washington State. The maps are centered on the core belief, which is also expressed in the Commission's statute, that electoral representation is strongest when communities of interest are united. His proposed congressional map is responsive to public input and government-to-government consultation with Tribal nations over the last several months.

1. Minimize county splits.

In this map, Walkinshaw reduces the number of counties split by multiple congressional districts from nine to three: King, Pierce, and Snohomish are the only counties that are split.

  • The split counties are the three most populous counties in the state. Counties 4-39 remain whole.
  • Two congressional districts are entirely within one county (the 7th and the 9th). In the current map there are zero that are entirely within one county.

2. Maintain and unite communities of interest and reduce city splits.

Walkinshaw’s map only splits 6 cities in the entire congressional map:

  • Auburn, Milton, Pacific (all split between the 9th and the 10th along the King/Pierce county line)
  • Seattle (the largest city in the state)
  • Tacoma (3rd largest city in the state)
  • Bellevue (5th largest city in the state)

3. Respect Tribal sovereignty.

As requested in government-to-government consultation, Walkinshaw’s congressional map unifies the Yakama Nation reservation and tribal lands down to the Columbia River in one congressional district.

4. Preserve the 9th congressional district as one where people of color make up a majority of the voting age population.

Walkinshaw’s 9th district is 55.8% people of color, which is almost exactly what the current 9th district is.

  • Burien is joined with communities in southeast Seattle and South King County.
  • Walkinshaw’s map also unifies majority POC cities of Kent, Auburn (King County portion), Des Moines, Newcastle, Tukwila, Renton, Federal Way and Bellevue south of I-90 in the 9th district.

Joe Fain

Senate Republican Caucus Appointee

View the Commissioner's proposed Congressional District map below:

View & Comment OnlineDownload PDF of MapDownload Shapefiles

Commissioner Statement on Draft Congressional District Map

Commissioner Fain's plan creates compact, competitive congressional districts that follow important geographical and political boundaries. This regional approach keeps most cities, counties, and school districts together and more than three-quarters of residents in their existing districts.

Read Full Statement +

Commissioner Joe Fain’s congressional plan reflects the straightforward and easily identifiable geographical regions of our state and the communities of interest they contain.

The plan creates compact, competitive congressional districts that follow important geographical and political boundaries. This regional approach keeps most cities, counties, and school districts together and more than three-quarters of residents in their existing districts.

One of the legal requirements of the Commission is “to encourage electoral competition.” Fain’s plan doubles the number of competitive districts from two to four to better keep the people’s representatives accountable and responsive to their local constituencies.

It also protects progress made in the 2011 redistricting plan, which created one majority-minority citizen of voting age population (CVAP) district.

The congressional districts are structured around these geographic regions of our state:  

  • 1st: North Metro/Tech Corridor
  • 2nd: North Puget Sound and Island Counties
  • 3rd: Southwest Washington
  • 4th: Central Washington
  • 5th: Eastern Washington
  • 6th: Pacific Coast & Olympic Peninsula
  • 7th: Seattle
  • 8th: The North Cascades
  • 9th: Suburban King County
  • 10th: South Puget Sound

Both Commissioner Fain’s legislative and congressional district plans set out his vision for competitive districts that keep communities of interest together. Fain looks forward to working with his fellow Commissioners to begin bipartisan negotiations and compromise as the November 15 deadline fast approaches. The Commissioner encourages members of the public to comment on proposed plans or submit their own draft plans through the Commission’s website.

View Proposed Legislative Maps

The voting Commissioners of the Washington State Redistricting Commission released draft Congressional District maps on Tuesday, September 28th, 2021.

Join the Commission Mailing List