Commission Proposed Maps

Legislative Maps

The Washington State Redistricting Commission released proposed Legislative District maps on Tuesday, September 21. Maps are available online to view and provide public comment, and also to download below.

April Sims

House Democratic Caucus Appointee

View the Commissioner's proposed congressional maps below:

View & Comment OnlineDownload PDF of MapDownload Shapefiles

Commissioner Statement on Draft Legislative District Map

Commissioner Sims’ proposed map reflects a commitment to a values-driven process of rebalancing the 49 legislative districts of Washington. The map is responsive to public input, government-to-government consultations with Tribal Councils, and recognizes the responsibility to create districts that provide fair representation for communities of interest...

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Values in Action: Commissioner Sims’ Proposed Legislative District Map 

Commissioner Sims’ proposed map reflects a commitment to a values-driven process of rebalancing the 49 legislative districts of Washington.  The map is responsive to public input, government-to-government consultations with Tribal Councils, and recognizes the responsibility to create districts that provide fair representation for communities of interest.  The following stated values guided the decisions needed to rebalance the state’s Legislative districts:

  • Protecting fair and effective representation
  • Maintaining and creating communities of interest
  • Respecting Tribal sovereignty and the government-to-government relationship with Tribal partners
  • Centering and engaging communities that have been historically underrepresented

Values in Action: Protecting fair and effective representation

While statewide population grew by nearly 1M, there was disproportionate growth in some key areas of our state. Ensuring that each district is as close to the 157,251-population target and drawn in a way that reflects the needs and interests of Washington state residents, was a top priority. This draft map rebalances the population of our state and draws boundaries that will lead to more opportunities to engage and grow the electorate.

Values in Action: Maintaining and creating communities of interest

Respecting the tremendous amount of public feedback to unify cities or communities, this draft map seeks to reduce the current legislative splits of cities.  Among a few of the most often requested, reducing the number of legislative districts for the cities of Renton and Bremerton, this map fulfills those requests reducing the splits of both cities.  In addition, the map is responsive to public comments requesting communities with similar interests be placed in the same legislative district or remain intact.  In every region of our state, from North to South and East to West, communities and cities previously divided are united.

Values in Action: Respecting Tribal sovereignty

The proposal reflects feedback from Tribal councils during our formal consultation process and, in some cases, comments submitted directly to the Commission.  Honoring those tribes who provided feedback, the draft map reflects the following:

  • Yakama: unites reservation land into one district
  • Colville: continues to split two LDs 
  • Chehalis: preserves existing split 
  • Tulalip: remains united in the 38th 
  • Squaxin Island: remains united in the 35th 

Values in Action: Centering and engaging communities that have been historically underrepresented 

This proposed map establishes nine majority POC legislative districts, including one majority Hispanic district in Yakima that is united with the Yakama Nation reservation. By lifting up the voices of those often under-represented and respecting the racially diverse area of South King County, the map draws four majority POC districts in the region, providing an opportunity for fair representation in one of the state’s most diverse areas.  Recognizing the map in 2011 only established two POC districts, a commitment to provide fair opportunities of representation for communities of color remains a key priority moving forward during the next steps of the process.  

Paul Graves

House Republican Caucus Appointee

View the Commissioner's proposed congressional maps below:

View & Comment OnlineDownload PDF of MapDownload Shapefiles

Commissioner Statement on Draft Legislative District Map

Graves’s map is faithful to the legal guidelines governing redistricting because it focuses on communities of interest and is not drawn to favor either party or incumbents. Graves’s map increases the overall number of competitive districts—those within 3 percent of 50/50, using an average of the 2020 statewide race results that pitted a Democrat against a Republican —to 11, nearly doubling the current six swing districts.

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New Map Increases Overall Number of Competitive Districts; Better Reflects Washington’s Diversity

Our politics are polarized, and a major reason is non-competitive districts. By making more districts competitive, more Washingtonians get to vote in up-for-grabs races, candidates and parties must work harder for their votes, and legislators will be encouraged to listen to all of their constituents. The proposed map issued by redistricting commissioner Paul Graves does just that.

The newly proposed map follows substantial public input with more than 20 public hearings across the state, hundreds of public comments, and scores of citizen-drawn map proposals.

A Competitive Map for Republicans and Democrats Alike

Graves’s map is faithful to the legal guidelines governing redistricting because it focuses on communities of interest and is not drawn to favor either party or incumbents.

Graves’s map increases the overall number of competitive districts—those within 3 percent of 50/50, using an average of the 2020 statewide race results that pitted a Democrat against a Republican —to 11, nearly doubling the current six swing districts.

A Voice to Historically Underrepresented Communities

The 2010 map featured two majority-minority districts; this map has eight, including a true South Tacoma district where a majority of the citizen voting age population is predominantly people of color. This map also takes into account the views of Washington’s tribal governments, providing districts that meet the requests of each tribal government that consulted with the redistricting commission.

Keeping Cities Together

The more communities of interest remain intact, the more influential they can ultimately be. This is a good government map—it’s competitive, fair, follows the constitutional requirements, and focuses on keeping communities of interest together.

Cities like Tacoma, Vancouver, Everett, Bremerton, and many others have experienced unnecessary district divisions for too long; this map works to consolidate those cities. This map also created a new JBLM district. All cities contained in this version of the 28th district have a population with more than 10% active-duty military or veteran status. Our servicemen and women put their lives on the line in service to our country; they deserve good representation.

Approval Process

This proposal is just the beginning of the negotiation process. We will continue to listen to the public and keep our process transparent. Paul Graves will be fighting for competitive districts that give Washingtonians the best chance to turn their votes into legislators they support.

Brady Piñero Walkinshaw

Senate Democratic Caucus Appointee

View the Commissioner's proposed congressional maps below:

View & Comment OnlineDownload PDF of MapDownload Shapefiles

Commissioner Statement on Draft Legislative District Map

Commissioner Walkinshaw's proposed map reflects a values-driven commitment to fair and effective representation in Washington State. The map is centered on the core belief, that is also expressed in the Commission's statute, that electoral representation is strongest when communities of interest are united. The plan is responsive to public input and government-to-government consultation with Tribal nations over the last several months. The work is reflected in the following areas:

Read Full Statement +

Commissioner Walkinshaw's proposed map reflects a values-driven commitment to fair and effective representation in Washington State. The map is centered on the core belief, that is also expressed in the Commission's statute, that electoral representation is strongest when communities of interest are united. The plan is responsive to public input and government-to-government consultation with Tribal nations over the last several months. The work is reflected in the following areas:

1. Create fair and effective representation in Yakima

This map unites the Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation and historically Hispanic and Latino communities in the 14th district, allowing for more fair and effective representation in the Yakima Valley.

  • The district not only unifies the Yakama Nation reservation, but also includes tribal lands down to the Columbia River as requested during government-to-government consultation.
  • Creates a majority-Hispanic/Latino district, 55.5% by Voting Age Population (VAP). Overall this new 14th is 65.5% people-of-color by VAP, including 9.4% American Indian/Alaska Native.

2. Create fair and effective representation with legislative districts where people of color make up a majority of the voting age population.

By Voting Age Population (VAP), this plan has 8 majority-minority districts, including one majority-Hispanic/Latino district in Yakima that also includes the entire Yakama Nation reservation.

  • This is a dramatic improvement from the final 2011 plan, which only had two majority-minority legislative districts by VAP.

3. Respect Tribal sovereignty.

The Commission committed to holding government-to-government consultations with tribal councils to hear directly from them about how they can be best represented in the redrawn map. This plan reflects requests heard from tribal councils directly, either during official consultations or via comment submitted to the Commission:

  • Yakama Nation: reservation and tribal lands united in the 14th LD (previously split between 14 and 15)
  • Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation: preserves the existing split between the 7th and 12th LDs
  • Confederated Tribes of the Chehalis Reservation: preserves the existing split between the 19th and 20th LDs
  • Tulalip Tribes: remains united in the 38th LD
  • Squaxin Island Tribe: remains united in the 35th LD

4. Maintain and unite communities of interest and reduce city splits.

This goal specifically includes Bremerton, Renton, and Mount Vernon. The Commission received overwhelming public comment about unifying Bremerton in one legislative district, and minimizing splits of Renton as well.

  • Other cities placed in fewer legislative districts than the 2011 plan:
  • We heard in public comment in Yakima, Bellingham and elsewhere that if their cities are split, neighborhoods, communities and school districts should not be. Many current legislative districts have illogical boundaries that unnecessarily divide local communities.
  • i.      When cities must be split (Yakima, Bellevue, Bellingham, etc.) these splits follow neighborhood or school district boundaries or large transportation corridors.

This proposed legislative map represents the Commissioner's values and what we've heard from the people of Washington state so far. By keeping communities together wherever possible and prioritizing the needs of tribal nations and historically underrepresented communities, the map provides the best opportunity for all kinds of communities to elect representatives of their choosing, from the Colville Reservation to Vancouver, from Bellingham to Walla Walla, and everywhere in between.

Joe Fain

Senate Republican Caucus Appointee

View the Commissioner's proposed congressional maps below:

View & Comment OnlineDownload PDF of MapDownload Shapefiles

Commissioner Statement on Draft Legislative District Map

Public education is the paramount duty of Washington State government. To reflect that constitutional directive, Commissioner Fain’s map places existing school district boundaries at the cornerstone of his legislative framework. The proposal protects close to three-quarters of all school districts in Washington from being split between multiple legislative districts to give greater voice to students, educators, and parents in state government. There is no greater community of interest than our public schools.

Read Full Statement +

Public education is the paramount duty of Washington State government. To reflect that constitutional directive, Commissioner Fain’s map places existing school district boundaries at the cornerstone of his legislative framework. The proposal protects close to three-quarters of all school districts in Washington from being split between multiple legislative districts to give greater voice to students, educators, and parents in state government. There is no greater community of interest than our public schools.

The proposal would also increase the number of competitive districts - a priority both for Washington state law and the Washingtonians who testified before the Commission over the last several months. Competitive elections keep our representatives accountable to the people and allow the democratic process to flourish. Fain estimates that his plan expands the number of competitive or swing districts from 11 to 15.

Despite the significant changes in Washington's population over the last 10 years, Fain's plan still manages to ensure that 73 percent of residents remain within their current legislative districts. At the same time, it prioritizes equality by balancing the population across districts.

Commissioner Fain's plan makes several changes to ensure that other communities of interest are kept intact during the next districting cycle. His proposal creates seven majority-minority districts statewide, and one additional majority-minority citizen voting age population (CVAP) district, increasing Washington's number from four to five.

The proposal reflects the interest of each of the tribal governments that communicated with the Commission. For example, the Yakama Reservation and related tribal lands would reside entirely within the 14th Legislative District, reflecting a desire expressed several times by representatives of the Tribal Council. The plan also recognizes the wishes of the Colville Tribes by not consolidating them into a single district.

Commissioner Fain's plan sets out his vision for legislative districts going into negotiations with the other three voting commissioners. With the Nov. 15 deadline for an agreement approaching, Fain looks forward to working with his bipartisan partners and encourages members of the public to comment on each of the draft plans or submit their own districting plans through the Commission’s website.

https://www.redistricting.wa.gov/participate/draw-your-wa

View the Congressional Maps

The Voting Commissioners of the Washington State Redistricting Commission will release draft Congressional District maps on Tuesday, September 28th, 2021.

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